Flag of Uganda

The Ugandan flag is composed of three colors in alternating sequence – black, yellow and red – consisting of six horizontal bands of equal widths. A white circle is situated right at its center encircling a grey crowned crane (facing towards the hoist) – the official symbol of Uganda. The three colors used in the flag are considered representations of the African aspirations. The color black signifies the African black; the yellow connotes the sunshine of Africa and the red which symbolizes the blood upon which the entire African nations are linked. Red is also interpreted as a symbol for fraternity. The bird crane is known for its legendary tender characteristics. It served as the army badge of Ugandan military under British domination.

The Ugandan flag officially became its national flag after it successfully obtained its freedom from the United Kingdom in October 9, 1962. At the time, however, political discord caused the introduction of another flag as espoused by the ruling party.

When the People’s Congress Party snapped victory in the election that followed, a fresh flag design was presented and had since been the official flag of Uganda, as it stands now. It is said that the three colors (black, yellow and red) were adopted from the colors of the People’s Congress Party.

The flag of Uganda was designed by the artistic hand of Mr. Grace Ibingira, the Minister of Justice in Uganda at the time of the flag’s adoption. The current flag was the second out of Ibingira’s two designs. Remarkably, the flag of Uganda did not undergo alterations since its adoption and despite the tumultuous recent history of Uganda.

It was believed that the Ugandan President Idi Amin Dada stole the original piece of the Ugandan flag, coat of arms and emblem and took them to Saudi Arabia in the middle of rebellion which sought his expulsion. It was believed that the stolen national symbols of Uganda were sold by the heirs of Amin after the latter’s death.

One response to “Flag of Uganda”

  1. nyunyu says:

    im so happy with my country

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